Pot Roast

DSC_0034I love how this pot roast turns out. I do not love scrubbing the dutch oven after, though, so this is a special treat in our house.

Lightly flour the sides of a pot roast. I like to get one that’s 3-4 lbs. because it fits well in my dutch oven. Choose a cut that fits your cookware! After you flour both sides, sprinkle a hefty amount of salt and then crack some pepper on each side. Lightly brown each side of the roast (about 5 minutes over medium-high heat) and remove to a plate. Lower the heat to medium-low.

Make thick cuts of 4 yellow onions so you have some chunky rings. Caramelize these in your dutch oven in about 3 tablespoons olive oil over medium-low heat. You’ll get some of the flavor from the beef on the onions and have fewer pieces to clean. Once the onions are translucent, add 4 cloves of minced garlic and cook for an additional 2 minutes. Turn the stove off.

Scrape the onions to lie across the bottom, sprinkle lightly with salt, and place your roast on top. Using a small can of tomato paste and a butter knife, ice the roast as you would a cake. Add two paste-cans worth of water or beef stock to the dutch oven. This won’t cover your roast, but should cover the onions to help keep them from burning. If two cans isn’t enough to get the liquid up to the roast line, add more. Sprinkle again with salt and pepper. Place one quartered carrot into the onion mix where there’s space.

Place the dutch oven lid on and put into a 350 degree oven. Cook approximately 1.5 hours, checking every 30-45 minutes and adding water/broth as needed. Remove the roast, slice, and put back into the dutch oven. Push the roast into the liquid. If the roast is not 3/4 covered with liquid, add more. Replace the lid. Cook another 1.5 hours, checking your liquid levels regularly. If you don’t want to slice it, don’t- just keep checking your liquid levels and cook for about 3 hours.

Serve with mashed potatoes, rice, or something else starchy and delicious for sopping up that flavor.

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Papas Borrachas

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Traditional drunk potatoes call for, you now, alcohol. I modified it because I am not a big beer drinker and don’t always have them in the fridge to cook with. If you’re very committed, add them to the beans in lieu of chicken stock and cook down. Add salt to taste since you’ll be missing that from the stock. Technically this makes them drunken black beans.

While your crispy rosemary potatoes are cooking, heat one tablespoon olive oil in a high walled skillet. Add three cloves of minced garlic and two finely sliced shallots. When garlic is lightly browned, add two cups of chicken stock and one can of drained black beans. Season with 1/2 teaspoon of sea salt. Bring to a gentle simmer, not a boil, and continue simmering until chicken stock has cooked down.

While the stock is reducing, cook one chopped yellow onion and one sliced bell pepper fajita style; you’re looking for lightly blackened edges.

When your potatoes are done, top with fajita style veggies and black beans. Graham likes his potatoes with breakfast sausage and a fried egg. I like mine with plain Greek yogurt and fresh jalapeño slices.

Serve hot.

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